Archive for May, 2014

Real US GDP Shrank in First Quarter of 2014

May 29, 2014

The real US GDP growth rate declined this quarter and is now at -1%, the first quarter of negative growth since 2011. Nominal GDP is up 11.7 billion, to $17.1 trillion. Click the chart to see our detailed GDP report.

–data from the St. Louis Federal Reserve

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US Civil War Had More Casualties than All Other Major American Wars Combined

May 27, 2014

According to this Pew Research report, more Americans died during the US Civil War than in all other major American wars combined. That includes both Union and Confederate losses.

–from Pew Research

Cost of Living Compared to Median Income Across the United States

May 22, 2014

The relative buying power of a dollar varies greatly across the United States, and this interactive chart shows the difference between the median income and the cost of living.

–from NPR

Middle Class Housing in the US

May 14, 2014

Only 14% of houses are available to the middle class and 25% of those in New York, while 86% of Akron, OH homes are available to them. This study uses the median household income for the city with 31% of income going towards the mortgage.

–from The Atlantic Cities

Cash Sales of Homes at All-Time High of 43%

May 9, 2014

The percent of US homes purchased with cash has reached an all-time high of 42.7%. This is nearly double the amount in the beginning of 2011.

–from RealtyTrac

Centenarians Happy to Live Long, Enjoyed Their 30’s Most

May 7, 2014

 

 

Centenarians, when not conflicted, enjoyed their 30’s most out of their lifespan and the vast majority are now widowed. Around 7% of 100+ year-olds never married.

 

–From The Washington Post

Price of Essentials Increasing While Prices for Gadgets Continue Precipitous Decline

May 5, 2014

In the past decade, prices for televisions fell more than 100%, while college tuition rose 40% and many essential items and services rose.

–from The Atlantic

Violent Crime Rates Vs. Incarceration Rates

May 1, 2014

While rates for violent crimes in the US have plummeted since 1979, the incarceration rate has radically increased over the same period.

–Data from Uniform Crime Reporting Statistics and National Prisoner Statistics Program