Archive for the ‘Education’ Category

US Federal Investments as a Percentage of GDP is Lessening with Time

January 21, 2015

Federal Investment as a share of GDP

The US federal government’s investments as a percentage of GDP is decreasing over time. This decrease is observed for both Defense and Non-Defense related things like roads, education and R&D.

–Source: The New York Times


Arts Majors Face Increased Student Loan Burdens after College

November 26, 2014

Graduates across all majors have similar loan amounts after graduation  However, payment is a heavier burden for students who graduate with degrees in arts, sports, or humanities.  After graduation, salaries increase by an average of 65% in the first five years. However, non-career-oriented degrees start at much lower wages (x axis in the chart above) and thus pay a significantly higher percentage of their income in loan payments.

–from The Atlantic

Educational Mobility Low in the United States

September 19, 2014

Educational mobility is quite low in the US, where the majority of people attain the same level of education as their parents, or worse. In other words, most people from uneducated families stay that way and vice versa.

–from The Economist

Private School Enrollment Rates High for America’s Wealthy Families

August 15, 2014


Approximately 26% of children in households making more than $200,000 attend private schools. New Orleans has the highest percentage of children in high schools, at 25%. Click through to read the excellent, broad study of America’s private school market. The linked study does not cover charter schools, which are an important, free alternative to poor traditional public schools.

–from The Atlantic

University-Educated Americans Moving to Different Cities than High-School Dropouts

June 17, 2014

This chart shows the net domestic migration between US cities from 2011 to 2012 by educational attainment. Cities like San Francisco and Seattle gained highly educated workers while losing those with high school diplomas or less, while cities like Tampa and Atlanta gained less-educated new arrivals. Large cities like New York still gained population overall via immigration, but lost domestic population.

–from The Atlantic’s CityLab 

Number of Doctoral Degrees Earned in the US in 2012: 51,008

January 30, 2014

There were 51,008 doctoral degrees granted in the US in 2012. The top five doctoral-granting states were California, New York, Texas, Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania. Of these graduate students, the vast majority are American citizens.

–from visualstatistix

Underemployment Rates for Recent College Grads Similar to 1990s

January 22, 2014

Overall underemployment rates for recent college grads is similar to levels in the early 1990’s. The main difference, as seen in the bottom chart, is that the share of recent grads with low wage jobs has increased substantially, even though the overall rate hasn’t changed much.

–from The Atlantic

Textbook Prices Grow at more than Three Times CPI

December 20, 2013

The CPI of educational books has increased 812% since 1978, while the entire CPI has only increased 250%. Click through for a nuanced and interesting discussion of educational textbook economics.


Wealth and Aptitude Test Scores Highly Correlated

December 3, 2013

The scores for the Armed Services Qualification Test are highly correlated with income, indicating that wealth provides a set of skills that is difficult to otherwise gain during youth.

–from The Brookings Institute and The Atlantic

Metros with the Most Educated Residents

November 13, 2013


There are only a handful of outlier metros that educated Americans are moving to, most notably the Bay Area and Raleigh, NC. The biggest and most well-known college towns (Ann Arbor, Ithaca, Ames, etc.) have extremely high shares of educated residents, largely due to their academic company-town environments. Click through for a searchable, interactive version.



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