Posts Tagged ‘Inequality’

Western Middle Classes Have Stagnating Incomes Compared to Emerging Markets

January 5, 2015

This chart shows the growth of real income growth (y axis) against percentile of global income distribution. While the middle classes of emerging markets have seen enormous gains in the past generation, Western middle class incomes, including the US, have significantly stagnated in comparison.

–from the New York Times

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Median American Household Lost 40% of Wealth since 2007

December 16, 2014

Americans have 40% less net worth than before the recession, dropping from a median $135,700 in 2007 to $81,400. White households lost 26% of their net worth. Black households fared much worse, with their median net worth dropping 43%, while the median Hispanic-American household’s worth dropped 42%.

–from MarketWatch.com

The Wealthiest US High School Dropouts Make Similar Money to Poor College Graduates

October 20, 2014

 

Wealthy high school graduates make similar incomes to poor college graduates. Nearly the same amount of rich dropouts stay in the top income quintile as poor graduates stay in the bottom (14% vs. 16%). Cumulative advantage (or disadvantage) is still noticeably present for the wealthy, even those who academically strive the least.

–from The Washington Post

Gentrification Highly Correlated to Neighborhood Racial Composition

August 7, 2014

The likelihood of gentrification is dependent on many variables, but one major indicator is racial composition. The likelihood of a neighborhood drops dramatically if more then 40% of the neighborhood is black. Likewise, neighborhoods with fewer than 35% white residents were significantly less likely to have gentrified between 1996 and 2009. Gentrification, it seems, can reinforce old borders of inequality.

–from The Atlantic’s CityLab

University-Educated Americans Moving to Different Cities than High-School Dropouts

June 17, 2014

This chart shows the net domestic migration between US cities from 2011 to 2012 by educational attainment. Cities like San Francisco and Seattle gained highly educated workers while losing those with high school diplomas or less, while cities like Tampa and Atlanta gained less-educated new arrivals. Large cities like New York still gained population overall via immigration, but lost domestic population.

–from The Atlantic’s CityLab¬†

Price of Essentials Increasing While Prices for Gadgets Continue Precipitous Decline

May 5, 2014

In the past decade, prices for televisions fell more than 100%, while college tuition rose 40% and many essential items and services rose.

–from The Atlantic

Top Earners Gain Income from Capital, not Labor

April 10, 2014

While most of the top 10% of Americans gain their wealth through labor, the deeper one goes into the top 1%, the more income is derived from capital.

–from Vox.com

Majority of Men’s Real Wages Down over Last Forty Years

March 17, 2014

For all men below the 70th income percentile, real wages have declined since 1973, with growing disparity towards the bottom of income distribution.

–from The New York Times

College Tuition Increases Disproportionately Affects Poorer Families

March 5, 2014

The percentage of income spent on tuition has greatly increased for the poorest Americans, but has remained relatively stable for the wealthiest quintile.

–from The New York Times

More Americans Identify as Lower Class

February 26, 2014

Between 2008 and 2014, an additional 15% of Americans view themselves as lower class, with 6% falling from upper to middle and another 8% dropping below middle.

–from CNN